Visit the main HIFA website: www.hifa2015.org

Family planning

Women’s reproductive health knowledge, attitudes and practices in relation to the Zika virus outbreak in northeast Brazil

Objectives: To assess knowledge, pregnancy attitudes and contraceptive practices in relation to the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil.

Methods: We interviewed 526 women 18 to 49 years old in primary health services in a Northeastern capital of Brazil, in 2016. They provided information about their knowledge of Zika transmission and health consequences, their receipt of counseling related to sexual and perinatal transmission of Zika, their pregnancy intentions and reassessment of contraceptive options in the context of the Zika virus outbreak.

Reaching Young Married Women and First-time Parents for Healthy Timing and Spacing of Pregnancies in Burkina Faso

This technical brief discusses Pathfinder’s experience in Burkina Faso, implementing a project to reach young married women, first-time parents, and their key influencers, for healthy timing and spacing of pregnancy through contraceptive use.   

Ideation and intention to use contraceptives in Kenya and Nigeria

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Contraceptive use remains low to moderate in most African countries. Ideation, or the ideas and views that people hold, has been advanced as a possible explanation for differences in contraceptive use within and across countries.
OBJECTIVES: In this paper, we sought to identify the relevant dimensions of ideation and assess how these dimensions relate to contraceptive use intentions in two illustrative countries, Kenya and Nigeria.

How can we educate our religious leaders on vaccination? (5)

Further to Beatrice Muraguri's comment that the head of Catholic Church in Kenya Cardinal John Njue has told women of reproductive age who are catholics not to agree to be vaccinated with Tetanus Toxoid, please find below three news items relating to this in Kenya's Daily Nation:

 

New report: Use of an Interactive Voice Response System to Deliver Refresher Training in Senegal

For the 222 million women who have an unmet need for modern contraception, increasing access to high-quality family planning services is essential. 

As countries work to scale up the number of health workers, it also makes sense to focus on the existing workforce. In-service training can improve the quality of family planning services by updating health workers' knowledge, but it is often expensive and requires providers to leave their posts during the training. 

Pages

Subscribe to Family planning