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Ethics in public health: call for shared moral public health literacy

Public Health (PH) in Europe has become much more vocal about its moral understandings since 1992. The rising awareness that PH issues were inseparable from issues of human rights and social justice almost self-evidently directed the agenda of EUPHA and the European Public Health (EPH)-conferences. Problems of cultural and behavioural change, and environmental issues on a global scale were also added.

Dynamics of evidence-informed health policy making in Pakistan

Incorporating evidence is fundamental to maintaining the general acceptance and efficiency in public policies. In Pakistan, different actors—local and global—strive to facilitate the development of evidence-informed health policies. Effective involvement however, requires knowledge of the country-context, i.e. knowing the intricacies of how policies are formulated in Pakistan. Obtaining this knowledge is one of the key steps to making interventions impactful.

Barriers and facilitators to health information exchange in low- and middle-income country settings: a systematic review

The exchange and use of health information can help healthcare professionals and policymakers make informed decisions on ways of improving patient and population health. Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have however failed to embrace the approaches and technologies to facilitate health information exchange (HIE). We sought to understand the barriers and facilitators to the implementation and adoption of HIE in LMICs.

10 Best resources for community engagement in implementation research

Implementation research (IR) focuses on understanding how and why interventions produce their effects in a given context. This often requires engaging a broad array of stakeholders at multiple levels of the health system. Whereas a variety of tools and approaches exist to facilitate stakeholder engagement at the national or institutional level, there is a substantial gap in the IR literature about how best to do this at the local or community level.

Taking knowledge users' knowledge needs into account in health: an evidence synthesis framework

The increased demand for evidence-based practice in health policy in recent years has provoked a parallel increase in diverse evidence-based outputs designed to translate knowledge from researchers to policy makers and practitioners. Such knowledge translation ideally creates user-friendly outputs, tailored to meet information needs in a particular context for a particular audience. Yet matching users'  knowledge needs to the most suitable output can be challenging.

Mind the gap: knowledge and practice of providers treating uncomplicated malaria at public and mission health facilities, pharmacies and drug stores in Cameroon and Nigeria.

Background: Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) has been the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Cameroon since 2004 and Nigeria since 2005, though many febrile patients receive less effective antimalarials. Patients often rely on providers to select treatment, and interventions are needed to improve providers' practice and encourage them to adhere to clinical guidelines.

Regional HIV knowledge hubs: a new approach by the health sector to transform knowledge into practice.

This study aims to introduce the knowledge hub (KH) as an initiative to facilitate transformation of knowledge into practice and to highlight the activity and limitations with this new policy. The study was conducted through a review of articles; expert views in this field were sought for further information. Regional human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) KHs were developed by the World Health Organization and GTZ. A series of activities including capacity building, development of training models, technical assistance, and application of studies are provided through these hubs.

A network study exploring factors that promote or erode interaction among diverse community health workers in rural Ethiopia

Task shifting in response to the health workforce shortage has resulted in community-based health workers taking on increasing responsibility. Community health workers are expected to work collaboratively, though they are often a heterogeneous group with a wide range of training and experience. Interpersonal relationships are at the very core of effective teamwork, yet relational variables have seldom been the focus of health systems research in low resource, rural settings.

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