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Uganda

Barriers and facilitators to health information exchange in low- and middle-income country settings: a systematic review

The exchange and use of health information can help healthcare professionals and policymakers make informed decisions on ways of improving patient and population health. Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have however failed to embrace the approaches and technologies to facilitate health information exchange (HIE). We sought to understand the barriers and facilitators to the implementation and adoption of HIE in LMICs.

Using theory and formative research to design interventions to improve community health worker motivation, retention and performance in Mozambique and Uganda.

ABSTRACT (provisional)
Background: Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly being used in low-income countries to address human resources shortages, yet there remain few effective, evidence-based strategies for addressing the enduring programmatic constraints of worker motivation, retention and performance. This paper describes how two interventions were designed by the Innovations at Scale for Community Access and Lasting Effects (inSCALE) project to address these constraints in Uganda and Mozambique drawing on behavioural theory and formative research results. 

Symptomatic presentation with cervical cancer in Uganda: a qualitative study assessing the pathways to diagnosis in a low-income country

Background: Symptomatic cervical cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries usually present with late stage disease and have poor survival. We explored the views of cervical cancer patients on their symptom appraisal and interpretations, and their help-seeking including lay consultations.

Malaria treatment policy change in Uganda: what role did evidence play?

Background: Although increasing attention is being paid to knowledge translation (KT), research findings are not being utilized to the desired extent. The present study explores the roles of evidence, barriers, and factors facilitating the uptake of evidence in the change in malaria treatment policy in Uganda, building on previous work in Uganda that led to the development of a middle range theory (MRT) outlining the main facilitatory factors for KT. Application of the MRT to a health policy case will contribute to refining it.
 

Use of television and video for health education in waiting rooms in health centres and hospitals (2)

Uganda is one of those resource constraint countries and there are TV and video tapes used for health education up to health center two in the community and the messages are translated into different languages of those localities. Its effectiveness is that, it is not just talking, but taped dramas are played and they draw the attention of mothers and other patients. By the time they come in contact with health workers, the hearts will be ready to receive what the health providers have for them. Sometimes, even when they are attended to, they continue watching.

Case Management of Severe Malaria - A Forgotten Practice: Experiences from Health Facilities in Uganda

Abstract
 
Introduction: Severe malaria is a life-threatening medical emergency and requires prompt and effective treatment to prevent death. There is paucity of published information on current practices of severe malaria case management in sub-Saharan Africa; we evaluated the management practices for severe malaria in Ugandan health facilities
 

Advancing discussions on pneumonia diagnostics

Pneumonia is one of a number of common causes of death among children below the age of five in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa ­ deaths that coould be avoided if appropriate care is sought or made available more quickly. In response, many countries are investing in community health workers to deliver life-saving treatment for young children. Diagnosis of pneumonia, however, still poses a challenge for many community health workers as the symptoms can appear similar to other febrile illnesses, often leading to wrong diagnosis and treatment.
 

Advancing discussions on pneumonia diagnostics

Pneumonia is one of a number of common causes of death among children below the age of five in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa ­ deaths that coould be avoided if appropriate care is sought or made available more quickly. In response, many countries are investing in community health workers to deliver life-saving treatment for young children. Diagnosis of pneumonia, however, still poses a challenge for many community health workers as the symptoms can appear similar to other febrile illnesses, often leading to wrong diagnosis and treatment.
 

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